Lexington Wild Flowers And Herbs

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Yarrow

  • Achillea millefolium
  • To 40 in. (1 m)
  • Flowers are white to pink
  • Leaves are fern like

Pokeweed

  • Achillea millefolium
  • To 10 ft (3 m)
  • Grows in fields and waste areas
  • Berries are toxic when raw but cooked juice is edible. The seeds remain toxic after cooking.
  • Berries were used for ink making

Canada Mayflower

  • Maianthemum canadense
  • To 6 in (15 cm)
  • Perennial
  • Has 1 to 3 leaves
  • Cluster of white flowers held above the leaves
  • Berry fruit becomes red and translucent when ripe

False Solomon Seal

  • Maianthemum racemosum
  • To 2 ft (60 cm)
  • Perennial
  • Leaves elongated and alternating
  • Round fruit turns red when ripe

Daisy Fleabane

  • Erigeron strigosus
  • To 5 ft (1.5 m)
  • May be annual or biennial
  • Name derived from the belief that the dried plants repelled fleas
  • Flowers are white, pink or lavender and have yellow disk

Stinging Nettle

  • Urtica dioica
  • To 4 ft (1.2 m)
  • Touching plant hairs produces burning sensation

Jack in the Pulpit

  • Arisaema triphyllum
  • To 3 ft (90 cm)
  • Herbaceous perennial plant
  • Curving hood ("Pulpit") covers over fingerlike central stem ("Jack")

Starflower

  • Trientalis borealis
  • To 8 in (20 cm)
  • Perennial

Goldenrod

  • Solidago genus
  • To 5 ft (1.5 m)
  • Perennial
  • Large clusters of small yellow flowers that appear from the end of summer until frost
  • Grows in open meadows, on the side of the road, in garbage areas
  • Produces golden yellow dye

New England Aster

  • Symphyotrichum novae-angliae (formerly Aster novae-angliae)
  • To 7 ft (2.1 m)
  • Perennial
  • Gold disk florets at tip of stems, surrounded by 30 or more ray florets that are purple, lavender, or light pink
  • Long leaves alternating along central stem and side branches which are covered with short white hairs

Bracken Fern

  • Pteridium aquilinum
  • To 5 ft (1.5 m)
  • Perennial
  • Instead of leaves, ferns have what are called fronds, subdivided in leaflets with small pinnae.
  • Bracken fronds are shaped like triangles
  • Grows in large colonies

Cinnamon Fern

  • Osmundastrum cinnamomeum
  • To 3 ft (90 cm)
  • Likes moist and marshy soil
  • Spreads by spores made on smaller cinnamon-colored frods

Common Milkweed

  • Asclepias syriaca
  • To 6 ft (1.8 m)
  • Stem and leaves produce a white latex when broken

Joe-Pye Weed

  • Eutrochium genus
  • To 7 ft (2.1 m)
  • Occurs naturally in moist and very wet soils, but also tolerates garden soil that is not too dry
  • Was used by New England healer Joe Pye to treat a variety of ailments, therefore the name

Jewelweed

  • Impatiens capensis
  • To 5 ft (1.5 m)
  • Juice from stems can be used as rubbing treatment for skin that had poison ivy contact

Skunk Cabbage

  • Symplocarpus foetidus
  • To 2 ft (60 cm)
  • Huge leaves rise directly from ground
  • Foul smelling flower attracts insects
  • Prefers wetlands, river banks

Cattail

  • Typha latifolia
  • To 10 ft (3 m)
  • Wetland plant